Add To Favorites

The measure up mentality in today's church

March 21, 2016 | by Charles Stone

I've served in full-time ministry for more than 35 years in churches in many places in the U.S.: the South, the Southwest, the far West and the Midwest. I now serve at a church in Ontario, Canada. I've noticed that a church's expectations of a pastor varies depending on the region. And when that church, culture, or pastor gets caught up in a 'measure up' mentality, it can be deadly. Consider these thoughts on the 'measure up mentality' in ministry.

When I served a large church in the central valley in California several years ago it seemed that I could easily meet the church's expectations. Yet in another large church in another part of the U.S. I found that meeting others' expectations was extremely challenging, especially among church members successful in business. I attribute that to both the business environment there that required you to perform at a high level and to the fact that that church was located near four well-known mega-churches with world class leaders and preachers. Comparison came with the territory.

However, here in Canada, I don't seem to face that same mentality as I did in that region of the U.S. 

Every ministry leader deals with this 'measure up mentality' to some extent. Although we can't avoid it, we can choose how we respond to it.

Some unwise choices include: 

• thinking we can please everyone

• morphing into someone we are not to get everybody's approval

• using "I can't please everyone" as an excuse to be lazy, not work hard, or avoid difficult problems or people

• obsessing over those you can't please

I admit that at times the 'measure up mentality' has sucked my joy out of ministry. But I've applied some simple ideas below that have helped me keep my joy even when I felt I didn't measure up in the eyes of others. Perhaps they will encourage you as well.

Remember this: 

• God made me who I am. I may not be a world-class leader, a 'blow you a way' preacher, or as creative as some, but I must appreciate, embrace, and faithfully use the gifts and competencies He has given me.

• He has placed me where He wants me to be. I must accept that and do my best with the opportunity He's provided.

• I must not dismiss or cutoff those with whom I don't measure up.

• It’s OK to take care of my valid needs. I can't change what other people think about me, make them like me, or force them to approve of me, but I can take care of the body, soul, and spirit God has entrusted to me. In doing so, I then become the best pastor and leader He has created me to be.

This old King James Version verse has encouraged me as I've faced the "measure up mentality."

Psalm 62:5, “My soul, wait thou only upon God; for my expectation is from him.” 

How have you handled the “measure up mentality”?


Charles Stone

Dr. Charles Stone is Lead Pastor at West Park Church (London, Ontario) and founder of StoneWell Ministries. He has authored four books including, People Pleasing Pastors: Avoiding the Pitfalls of Approval Motivated Leadership (IVP 2014), and Brain-Savvy Leaders: The Science of Significant Ministry (Abingdon, May 2015). He is passionate about intersecting insight about the brain with Biblical insight. He posts regularly at www.charlesstone.com.



Learn More »
Recognizing changing seasons of leadership
Could the seasons have changed in your leadership career without you noticing?
8 signs you may be an anxious leader
When a leader leads as an anxious leader, he stifles his leadership effectiveness. So, what ...
And it is my prayer that your love may abound more and more, with knowledge and all discernment, so that you may approve what is excellent, and so be pure and blameless for the day of Christ.
Philippians 1:9-10 (ESV)
Bud Brown

An experienced ministry leader, writer and educator, Bud Brown is co-founder of Turnaround Pastors and ...

Greg Atkinson

Greg Atkinson is the Founder of Worship Impressions and Executive Director of ExPastors.com. Greg ...